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3D-printed human organs could extend life spans to 120 years: experts

Experts at Dubai’s Knowledge Summit have revealed that technological advancements combined with 3D-printed human organs can contribute to mankind’s longevity.

While improving quality of life and leading healthy lifestyles contributes to longevity, continuous technology development will help increase life spans, said the panellists.
While improving quality of life and leading healthy lifestyles contributes to longevity, continuous technology development and 3D-printing will help increase life spans, said the panellists.

The panel discussion, which took place on day two of the summit, gathered scientists and medical professionals together, highlighted the fundamental ways techology, particularly 3D-printing, could transform the healthcare sector as we know it. An overarching theme of the conversation was that while improving quality of life and leading healthy lifestyles contributes to longevity, continuous technology development will help increase life spans.

Raymond McCauley, co-founder of BioCurious and a biotechnology scientist, said advanced cell replacement, repair and genetic editing combined with 3D-printed organs can extend life spans past the 120-year barrier. The average now is between the 80s, up to 120 in developed countries.

“Demographically, we can make a good case that the future belongs to the old. Just last year, we passed a milestone where there are more people over 65 now than there are under 16, for the first time in human history. For people working in different fields, the number of people on earth over 65 represents a global market bigger than China,” said McCauley.

John Nosta, founder of NOSTALAB, said while the body sees major weaknesses after age 40, technology will help build new muscles to overcome the loss of muscle mass, for instance. “The path to longevity is not wellness or prevention, it’s an earlier technology-mediated disease detection,” Nosta said, adding if cancer could be predicted before it even happens, it means that technology shares a border with prevention. “We can leverage technology, in the form of stem cells or collagen repair mechanisms or 3D-printed organ replacement. Longevity lies close to technology because it shares a border with prevention.”

Nosta went on to add that as things currently stand, a girl born in the UK has a one-in-three chance of living till she is 100 years of age. But with a growing ageing population lies more opportunities for economic and social development, said Nosta, which will also impact GDP and achieve higher levels of productivity. “We will see someone with the wisdom of 70 or 80 years apply that to a business or educational dynamic; that’s the game changer.”

Meanwhile, Shafi Ahmed, co-founder of Virtual Medics and Medical Realities, said 3D-printing will help in organ transplantation in the long run. In the US, one person is added to the waiting list for organ donation every 14 minutes. While an average of 17,000 receive transplants, 20 percent die before the organ implanted becomes effective.

“That’s where the question comes in: would you rather wait four years and die without finding one? Or have a chance to get an organ printed and inserted right away,” said Ahmed. But 3D-printing of organs must be tackled from a humane point of view and considered if it will help people. “It’s not about expanding lifetimes but the quality of life that has to be built around wellness,” said Ahmed.

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